A while ago I ordered some pizza online – well 41 pizzas, to be exact. The process was smooth: open a mobile app, choose the products, transfer to shopping cart, fill in delivery details, contact info, and credit card data, click “Pay now”. Then something really odd happened: I saw an order confirmation flash on the screen but in a couple of seconds it was blotted out by a big, red “payment refused” message. At the same time, my email inbox notified me I had a new message. The message said my pizza order was received and confirmed. Was it, really? I needed to feed 40 hungry people.

My pizza order is an example of (semi-)digital business processes with multiple actors and information systems. I am sure that every single application, system, and database was carefully tested and found to be free of defects. Still, the entire process unfolded erratically.

Just think of more complex processes, such as industrial order fulfilment with consignment stock or a health insurance case. The business process uses several information systems of different types, age and size, possibly even in different corporations.

Some of the systems may be updated weekly while some others were last touched in the 1990s. Data may be transferred and replicated among the systems and it keeps changing frequently. Workflows may be long and asynchronous, human involvement may be necessary at some points of the process. Isn’t it a miracle that things work at all?

The quality of human life is highly dependent on the quality of digital business processes. This is why we created Qentinel Pace, a robotic software testing solution that is able to automate the testing and monitoring of digital business processes, end-to-end.


Contact us to get a demo and see how Qentinel Pace makes quality of digital business processes visible and actionable – because your business is only as good as the software driving it.

Topics:

Software Testing, Customer Experience


Esko Hannula

Esko Hannula

esko.hannula@qentinel.com

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